Theory of Ferromagnetism
#1
Theory of Ferromagnetism

by Devin MacDonald

In Iron-56, strong exchange interactions occur between the 4 unpaired 3d electron orbitals and the axis of rotational symmetry of the Iron-56 nucleus itself... a very rare property amongst all chemical elements.

These strong electron <-> atomic nucleus exchange interactions arise partly from 3-fold axis of rotational symmetry of the fermi surface of the 4 unpaired 3d electron orbitals of an Iron-56 nucleus, which I believe correlate with a 3-fold axis of rotational symmetry of the Iron-56 Nucleus itself, and partly due to each of the 30 neutrons and 26 protons in the nucleus possessing the least mass per nuclear particle of all the chemical elements.

Since according to E=MC^2, MASS is proportional to ENERGY, and ENERGY is proportional to MOMENTUM, each of the Iron-56 nuclear particles must contain the least amount of relative momentum of all the chemical elements.

Since electrons in the 4 unpaired 3d electron orbitals are attracted to the protons in the nucleus via the fundamental electric force, below a certain temperature, the 3-fold axis of rotational symmetry of the 4 unpaired 3d electron orbitals become coupled with the 3-fold axis of rotational symmetry of the Iron-56 nucleus itself... a very rare property amongst all chemical elements.

Above a certain temperature, "phonons" destroy this symmetry-axis "coupling" effect. So unlike other elements, when the electrons pass through nearby wires, this ultimately changes the rotational symmetry axis of nearby Iron-56 nuclei, not just the 4 unpaired 3d electron orbitals themselves.

Evidence supporting the 3-fold axis of rotational symmetry of the Iron-56 nucleus comes from experimental close-packing of 56 magnetized spheres (pictured below).

As a result of this property of "coupling" between the electron orbitals and nuclear rotational axis of symmetry in certain materials like Iron-56, due to low nuclear momentum and shared electron/nuclear symmetry, we witness both "spontaneous ferromagnetism" and mysterious "inductance" in the world around us.

Devin MacDonald
BuildElectricBoards.com | TPPSF.com
3/25/17

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#2
Ferromagnetism Experiment Proposal

by Devin MacDonald

It could provide new insight into the structure of atomic nuclei if an experiment could be set up where:

H-Inductance and Magnetic Field Strength values are measured for multiple test samples with different Isotope compositions of Fe-Iron

If the different Isotopes have different H-Inductance and magnetic field strength values, it implies the atomic nucleus itself is involved in ferromagnetism, not just the electron orbitals.

If the atomic nucleus turns out to drastically affect H-Inductance and and Magnetic Field Strength Values, then the H-Inductance measurement provides a new variable with which to measure the atomic nucleus.

If these measurements were combined with the latest computational models of the nucleus, it could possibly provide new insights into properties of the strong nuclear force, the electromagnetic force, and possibly the weak force and gravity as well.

Based on my theory and observations, I would expect an Iron-56 solenoid core to have the highest measured H-Inductance, followed by Iron-58, followed by Iron-57.


I expect this to be a result of Iron-56 having the least mass per nucleon of the three, followed by Iron-58, followed by Iron-57. Furthermore I expect this to be a result of the  Iron-56 nucleus containing the most closely packed nucleons of all elements due to its lowest mass / momentum per nucleon property, as well as the suspected high degree of shared rotational symmetry between the Iron-56 nucleus and the 4 unpaired hybridized 3d electron orbitals.
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